Challenge Five - Due July 15th at Midnight

Prime Factorization

Find a solution to the following problem, using either Python or LabVIEW:

A Pythagorean Triplet is a set of three natural numbers: a < b < c, for which a^2 + b^2 = c^2. 
For example, 3^2 + 4^2 = 9 + 16 = 25 = 5^2

There is exactly one Pythagorean Triple where the three numbers add up to equal 1,000 (a + b + c = 1,000).

What is the product of those three numbers?


Individual winners will be selected for speed of execution, most compact code, and best documented. There is no reason that any one submission can win on all of these.

When you’ve found your solution, email it to us (FIRSTTeam585 (at) gmail.com) so we can include it in the entries. You can enter in Python, LabVIEW, or both!

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Challenge Four - Due June 24th at Midnight

The Largest Palindrome

Find a solution to the problem, using either Python or LabVIEW:

A palindromic number reads the same both ways. For example: 43134 is a palindrome.

The largest palindrome made from the product of two 2-digit numbers is 9009 = 91 x 99.

Find the largest palindrome made from the produce of two 3-digit numbers.

Individual winners will be selected for speed of execution, most compact code, and best documented. There is no reason that any one submission can win on all of these.

When you’ve found your solution, email it to us (FIRSTTeam585 (at) gmail.com) so we can include it in the entries.  You can enter in Python, LabVIEW, or both!
  

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Challenge Three - Due June 17th at 2:30 PM

Prime Factorization

Find a solution to the following problem, using either Python or LabVIEW:

The prime factors of 13195 are 5, 7, 13, and 29.

What is the largest prime factor of the number 600851475143?.

Construct a program that can find the largest prime factor of any positive integer.  (We will test your program with more than just the two integers identified above).
 

Individual winners will be selected for speed of execution, most compact code, and best documented. There is no reason that any one submission can win on all of these.

When you’ve found your solution, email it to us (FIRSTTeam585 (at) gmail.com) so we can include it in the entries. You can enter in Python, LabVIEW, or both!

See the SubmissionsCheck the Leader Board

Challenge Two - Due May 19th at 2:30 PM

The Fibonacci Sequence

Find a solution to the problem, using either Python or LabVIEW:

Each new term in the Fibonacci Sequence is generated by adding the previous two terms. By starting with 1 and 2, the first ten terms would be: 

     1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ….

By considering the terms in the Fibonacci sequence whoses values do not exceed four million, find the sum of the even-valued terms.

When you’ve found your solution, email it to us (FIRSTTeam585 (at) gmail.com) so we can include it in the entries.  You can enter in Python, LabVIEW, or both!
  

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Challenge One - Due May 12th at 2:30 PM

Getting started - create an elegant code that finds you a solution

Find a solution to the following problem, using either Python or LabVIEW:

If we list all the natural numbers below 10 that are multiples of 3 or 5, we get 3, 5, 6 and 9. The sum of these multiples is 23.

Find the sum of all the multiples of 3 or 5 below 1000.
 

Individual winners will be selected for speed of execution, most compact code, and best documented. There is no reason that any one submission can win on all of these.

Python is completely free to get from http://python.org and we can install the FRC version of LabVIEW on Windows, for the remainder of this calendar year.

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